Words from the Heart for Wednesday March 27th, 2019

So the king stood beside the gate while all his men marched out in units of hundreds and of thousands. The king commanded Joab, Abishai and Ittai, “Be gentle with the young man Absalom for my sake.”

2 Samuel 18:4-5 (NIV)

  Listen to Words from the Heart

Loving Your Enemies

The British North American colonies that today constitute modern Canada had no control over their foreign affairs until the achievement of responsible government in the late 1840s. Up until that time, wars, negotiations and treaties were carried out by the British government to settle disputes concerning the colonies over fishing, boundaries, and to promote trade. Notable examples from the colonial period include the Nootka Convention, the War of 1812, the Rush–Bagot Treaty, the Treaty of 1818, the Webster–Ashburton Treaty, and the Oregon Treaty. Before the granting of responsible government, British diplomats handled foreign affairs.

***

One of the most challenging principles, and one that certainly runs contrary to the principles of the world, is the call of Jesus to love our enemies, and treat well those who mistreat us. This isn’t just a New Testament principle. King David understood this to be true, and put it into practice, even when his enemy was this own son Absalom. Absalom had been trying to woo the people of Israel, winning their allegiance so he could take over his father David’s throne. David had run for his life. The tide began to turn, however, and the day came when the troops loyal to David were heading to face Absalom and his troops. David is convinced not to go into battle, and 2 Samuel 18:4-5 says this: “So the king stood beside the gate while all his men marched out in units of hundreds and of thousands. The king commanded Joab, Abishai and Ittai, ‘Be gentle with the young man Absalom for my sake.’” Be gentle with my enemy, David says. How can you put this principle into practice in your life today?

These have been words from the heart.
Bob Beasley